Faculty Profiles

Dr. Jeffrey Allen

Jeffrey Allen, M.D.
Dr. Allen currently holds the Otto and Marguerite Manley and Making Headway Endowed Chair of Pediatric Neuro-oncology at NYU and is a Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology. He is a pediatric neurologist who specializes in the care of children and young adults with primary CNS tumors. His career interests include developing innovative therapies for children with newly diagnosed and recurrent CNS tumors; acquiring a greater understanding of the causes and natural history of CNS tumors, especially those that arise in children with genetic disorders such as NF1 and NF2; and monitoring and ameliorating late effects of therapy for these illnesses.

Dr. Allen heads the Neuro-oncology Programs in the Perlmutter Cancer Center, the Division of Pediatric Neuro-oncology in the Department of Pediatrics and The Neurofibromatosis Center at NYU. He has served in leadership roles in the Children's Oncology Group, serves on several editorial boards and directs the Pediatric Neuro-oncology Fellowship Program at NYU. He has published extensively on subjects related to the etiology of CNS cancer, the natural history of various pediatric CNS tumors and the late effects of therapy. 

Teena Bhatla, M.D.

Teena Bhatla, M.D.

Dr. Bhatla is Clinical Instructor of Pediatrics in the Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology. After completion of pediatric hematology-oncology fellowship from NYU School of Medicine, she was appointed as faculty in our division in November, 2011. Her clinical and research interests include pediatric hematologic malignancies and benign hematology. Dr. Bhatla's research focuses on understanding the biological pathways of relapsed childhood leukemia with special interest in the epigenetic alterations. She is a member of the American Society of Pediatric Hematology-oncology, the American Society of Hematology and the Children's Oncology Group.

 

 

William Carroll, M.D.

William Carroll, M.D.
William L. Carroll, MD, is Director of the Perlmutter Cancer Center and the Julie and Edward J. Minskoff Professor of Pediatrics and Pathology. He received his medical degree from the University of California, Irvine and completed residency and chief residency in pediatrics at Children’s Hospital Medical Center Cincinnati. His post-doctoral training in pediatric hematology/oncology was performed at Stanford University where he trained in the laboratory of Dr. Ronald Levy. He received additional training in the laboratory of Dr. Stanley Korsmeyer at Washington University before embarking on his independent research career.

Dr. Carroll has had a long-standing interest in discovering the underlying pathways that drive the formation of childhood cancers particularly acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recent work from his laboratory has led to the identification of pathways that lead to drug resistance and relapse. Based on this work a number of early phase clinical trials have emerged.

Prior to assuming the role of Director, Dr. Carroll was the inaugural Chair of the Children’s Oncology Group ALL Committee and under his leadership 14 studies were completed, 10 new trials were initiated and over 8,000 children were enrolled on protocols. Importantly the cure rate for childhood ALL continued to increase during this period.

Dr. Carroll was Deputy Director of the Huntsman Cancer Institute prior to coming to New York and served in that capacity at NYU before assuming the role of Director in 2007. He served on NCI Subcommittee A and chaired the committee in 2006 - 2007. He serves on numerous national committees and is a member of the External Advisory Board of four NCI Cancer Centers. He is Co-Director of the Molecular Oncology and Immunology Training Grant at NYU and his laboratory is funded by the NCI. He is a member of the Basic Mechanisms of Cancer Therapeutics Study Section.

Linda Granowetter, M.D.

Dr. Linda Granowetter

Dr. Granowetter is a Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology. She is an internationally respected pediatric oncologist, clinician, educator and clinical researcher. Dr. Granowetter is a graduate of the SUNY at Stony Brook School of Medicine. She completed her internship and residency at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children in Philadelphia, and a fellowship in Pediatric Hematology-Oncology at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). She served as an Assistant Professor at CHOP, and then the Children’s Hospital National Medical Center, before she returned to her New York roots to take a position at the Mount Sinai Medical Center where she served for more than ten years.  Dr. Granowetter joined her colleagues at the Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York (CHONY) Columbia University Medical Center, in February 2001. She served as the Director of Clinical Services for Pediatric Oncology, the Medical Director for the Pediatric Oncology, Stem Cell Transplant, and Hematology in-patient Unit at CHONY until 2009, when she was recruited to the NYU faculty.

Dr. Granowetter also serves as the Principal Investigator for the NYU-Langone  site of the Children’s Oncology Group, and is co-chair of the Institutional Performance Monitoring Committee for the COG.  Dr. Granowetter is a member of the NYU center-wide Ethics committee and a founding member of the Pediatric Palliative care Consult program at NYU. Dr. Granowetter’s clinical and clinical research interests are in the treatment of bone and soft tissue tumors, and in the delivery of supportive and palliative care. Dr. Granowetter is the recipient of the 2001 SIOP (International Society of Pediatric Oncology) Prize for her research presentation about treatment of Ewing Sarcoma. Dr. Granowetter has served on the Ewing Sarcoma subcommittee and the Palliative Care Committee of the Children’s Oncology Group, and has served as the chair of an international Ewing’s Sarcoma Study. Dr Granowetter is a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Society of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology and SIOP (the International Pediatric Oncology society. Dr. Granowetter’s publications include clinical studies related ton Ewing sarcoma, desmoids tumors and supportive and palliative care. 

Matthias Karajannis, M.D., M.S.

Matthias Karajannis, M.D., M.S.


Dr. Karajannis joined the department as an assistant professor in 2007, after completing fellowships in pediatric hematology/oncology and neuro-oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. He received a Master of Science degree in Clinical Investigation from NYU in 2009. His clinical and research interests include pediatric oncology and neuro-oncology.

Dr. Karajannis currently co-directs the NYU Comprehensive Neurofibromatosis Center and our pediatric neuro-oncology fellowship program. He is pursuing translational research on molecular targeted therapies for pediatric brain tumors, including neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) related tumors. He is an NIH/NCI-funded investigator and is currently leading several single-institution as well as multicenter clinical-translational trials with novel therapeutic agents for children with brain tumors.


Catherine S. Manno, M.D.

Catherine S. Manno, M.D.

Dr. Manno is the Pat and John Rosenwald Professor and Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics.  She is a nationally renowned pediatric hematologist, clinician, researcher and teacher.  Dr. Manno came to NYU Langone Medical Center in the fall of 2008 from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, where she held the Elias Schwartz Endowed Professorship in Pediatric Hematology.  At the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Dr. Manno held key administrative roles, including Vice-Chair of the Department of Pediatrics, and President of the Executive Committee of the Medical Staff.  A practicing hematologist, she also served as medical director of the Homeostasis and Thrombosis Center and was honored with numerous awards for outstanding teaching.

Dr. Manno has been the principal investigator of critical research studies in the area of gene transfer for hemophilia B.  She has published widely on topics such as gene therapy for hemophilia, pediatric transfusion medicine, and hematologic disorders in children. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, a member of the American Pediatric Society, and recently chaired the Parent Committee for Program Project Review at the NHLBI. Since arriving at NYULMC, she has focused on the recruitment of key new faculty in the Department of Pediatrics, laying the groundwork for Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital, envisioned to open in 2017.

Elizabeth Raetz, M.D.

Elizabeth Raetz, M.D.

Dr. Elizabeth Raetz is a Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology.  She joined the NYU Langone faculty in 2005.  Her research focuses on clinical and translational studies in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with a special interest in developing novel therapy for high risk and relapsed leukemia and investigating predictors for common toxicities associated with ALL treatment.  She is also actively involved in developing therapy for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with leukemia. 

Dr. Raetz has been an active member of the national Children’s Oncology Group (COG) ALL Committee for the past 10 years, serving on the Executive Committee and as the study chair for clinical trials in relapsed ALL and disease classification.  She presently serves as a Vice Chair for the COG ALL Disease Committee and ALL Disease Committee liaison for the COG Adolescent and Young Adult Committee.

Dr. Raetz serves on several committees within the Perlmutter Cancer Center and is the Chair of the Data and Safety Monitoring Committee.  She presently serves as the Director of the Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Fellowship Training Program at NYU and as Interim Chief of the Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology and Medical Director of the Hassenfeld Center.  Dr. Raetz completed her undergraduate studies at Duke University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, her medical education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she was elected into Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society, and her fellowship training at the University of Utah.

Elizabeth Roman, M.D.

Dr. Roman is Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology and serves as Co-Director of the Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Fellowship Program.  Dr. Roman joined NYU Langone Medical Center in January 2011, where she is responsible for coordinating medical student and resident education and developing the pediatric hematology program at NYU.  Previously, Dr. Roman was an attending physician in hematology and hematopoietic cell transplantation at Columbia University Medical Center, Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York -Presbyterian. After this, she moved to the Mount Sinai Medical Center where she practiced oncology in addition to hematology and hematopoietic cell transplantation.

Her clinical interests and research experience have been diverse, including targeted therapy and reduced intensity transplant for AML and supportive care. She is a fellow in the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Allan Rubenstein, M.D.

Allan Rubenstein, M.D.

Dr. Rubenstein is Clinical Professor of Neurology and Pediatrics.   Dr. Rubenstein joined NYU as Co-Director of the NYU NF1 program in 2009.  Prior to that he was on the faculty of  the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York, where  he founded the Mount Sinai Neurofibromatosis Research and Treatment Center. The Center was the first interdisciplinary clinic devoted to neurofibromatosis in the world, and has been a model for over 75 other  NF clinics in the U.S. and Europe.  Dr. Rubenstein was one of the founders of the Children’s Tumor Foundation, a voluntary organization which supports research and clinical care  in neurofibromatosis, and was its Medical Director for 25 years.   He is presently Medical Director Emeritus.

Dr. Rubenstein has authored or edited numerous publications and 3 books on NF. He has served as an advisor to several research and governmental agencies, including the NINDS, the FDA,  the Neurogenetics Study Section of the National Cancer Institute, and the Department of Defense NF Research Program Integration Panel, which he headed in 2001. He is a reviewer for several scientific publications and was a Contributing Editor of the Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine for many years.  Dr. Rubenstein founded and was the CEO of NexGenix Pharmaceuticals from 2003-2011,  a biotechnology company focused on drug development for neurofibromatosis and related sporadic tumors.  He is currently  Chairman of the Board of Directors of CalAsia Pharmaceuticals, a biotechnology company developing novel protein folding drugs, and is the Vice-Chairman and Lead  Director of The Cooper Companies, a medical device company.  He received an award  from the East Manhattan Chamber of Commerce for his work on NF and a concert series for children receiving treatment at Hassenfeld Pediatric Cancer Center at NYU was established in his honor. 

Michael Nardi, M.S.

Michael Nardi, M.S.

Mr. Nardi is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Pathology at New York University Medical School.  A fruitful collaboration with Simon Karpatkin, M.D. in the Department of Medicine in basic science research of platelet immunohematology in relation to HIV-1-related thrombocytopenia and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia resulted in more than 25 publications elucidating the mechanism of thrombocytopenia.  More recently, Mr Nardi, in collaboration with Jeffrey S. Berger, M.D. in the Department of Medicine, has become interested in platelet hyper-reactivity and the possible associated role of miRNA.

In addition, Mr. Nardi is the Manager of the Special Coagulation Laboratory at NYU Langone Medical Center.  The laboratory is a full service facility providing complete laboratory testing in hemostasis.  In this capacity Mr. Nardi provides teaching sessions in laboratory medicine for interns, residents and fellows in the Departments of Pathology, Pediatrics and Medicine as well as participating in clinical laboratory research.  In collaboration with Margaret Karpatkin, M.D. his contributions to the clinical medicine literature include the first descriptions of the normal ranges for Prothrombin, C4b-binding protein and the naturally occurring anticoagulants Protein C and Protein S in neonates and early childhood.  Also the first description of a micromethod using flow cytometry for the determination of platelet surface IgG, helpful in the diagnosis of ITP, was published.  This method resulted in a 95% reduction in the amount of blood required for performance of this test.  Under his guidance the laboratory has published papers showing the utilization of HPLC technology for the direct identification of hemoglobinopathies.  Most recently he has been investigating means of improving the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome in the clinical laboratory.


David Salsberg, Ph.D.

Dr. David Salsberg is a licensed clinical neuropsychologist in Manhattan and a Clinical Instructor at The NYU School of Medicine. Dr. Salsberg is the Supervisor of Pediatric Psychology and Neuropsychology at NYU Langone Medical Center’s Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation, which services Rusk, Tisch Hospital, Hospital for Joint Diseases, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, and The Hassenfeld Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders. Dr. Salsberg works with children of all ages and their families with various physical, neurological, psychological and learning disabilities. In teaching and clinical work his primary focus is on the proper assessment, diagnosis and appropriate school and treatment recommendations for each child.

Dr. Salsberg has published numerous articles and chapters, led research, and has presented at Grand Rounds and conferences at numerous hospitals, schools and institutions. Dr. Salsberg has also served as an expert witness in civil, federal and criminal court cases, in addition to many educational law hearings. In addition to clinical work, Dr. Salsberg helped develop and serves on the board of several not-for-profit organizations including Growth and Development Services and Camp Excel, Daniel’s Music Foundation. He also serves on numerous professional advisory boards, including The Gateway School, The Reece School, and The IDEAL School, as well as The Meeting House, an after-school program for children with special needs.